sd2 files

GoldWave general discussions and community help
Post Reply
Spiecus
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2008 10:54 pm

sd2 files

Post by Spiecus »

does anyone have an add-in that will covert sd2 files to something goldwave can handle?
thanks
spiecus

DougDbug
Posts: 2062
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2005 3:33 pm
Location: Silicon Valley

Post by DougDbug »

I've never run-across an SD2 file, and the conversion programs I normally use don't seem to support it. :( However, when I searched for "SD2 to WAV" I did get some hits, including a FREE utility called sdTwoWav.

You could also try some other search terms like "SD2 CODEC", or "SD2 converter".

Does the file play on your computer? (I think if you can play a file, GoldWave will usually open it.) If you can play it, you can always make an analog recording (if that's acceptabel to you). There is some information in the GoldWave FAQ on how to record "What-U-Hear".

The Great Watbol!
Posts: 34
Joined: Mon Sep 22, 2008 5:07 am
Location: In the back of your mind(s)

sd2 to wav

Post by The Great Watbol! »

I went to that sight, and it seems to explain that sd2 files, are RAW files.
Knowing this, can't you use the open raw/pcm signed '24bit '48K
'little endian 'sterio ¿? :?: :idea: If so, try it. it might save you
from d'l another utility, Ya'know¿
------------------------------
¿¿¿-:·}~ «-{Watbol}-» ©2000® ☆*★*☆
(•¿•)

DewDude420
Posts: 1164
Joined: Fri Mar 11, 2005 11:15 pm
Location: Washington DC Metro Area
Contact:

Post by DewDude420 »

riverpast.com wrote:"SDII (Sound Designer II, sometimes seen abbreviated as SD2) is a monophonic/stereophonic audio file format, originally developed by Digidesign for their Macintosh-based recording/editing products. It is the successor to the original monophonic Sound Designer I audio file format.An SDII file can be monophonic or stereophonic. When stereo is used, the tracks are interleaved (sample-001-left, sample-001-right, sample-002-left, sample-002-right, etc.) Files also store sample rate and bit depth information. The SDII file has become a widely accepted standard for transferring audio files between editing applications. Most Mac CD-ROM writer software, for example, specifies SDII or Audio Interchange File Format as the file format needed when making audio CDs. The SDII file has also become accepted among personal computer audio application developers. This makes transferring audio from Mac to PC platforms much easier. When used on a PC, the file must use the extension of ".sd2". To convert SD2 files to other audio formats, please make sure Apple QuickTime is installed
Watboi wrote:I went to that sight, and it seems to explain that sd2 files, are RAW files.
Knowing this, can't you use the open raw/pcm signed '24bit '48K
'little endian 'sterio ¿?
no. the headers and the way the file is constructed is what goldwave can't understand..it can probably understand the PCM data within the file, but it can't make sense of the file...it's not pure RAW where there's no data and just PCM header.


This has been talked about before...I remember someone asking about DigiDesign formats. From best I can tell, it's possible they're some sort of PCM audio...but the files are encoded differently. Since it was designed for post-production studio work, the files are interleved...so granted it might be one file, but it's merely acting like a zip which has other files that contain each channel...the software assembles them into stereo, that's not to mention the other headers that can be in the files that throw decoders off.

Quicktime will play these, and in theory, the quicktime plugin should load them, but the files need to be flattened. There are a couple of converters...and i'm sure most of them require Quicktime be installed. There are a few *nix solutions, but i don't know how they work...I lack any SD2 files. If you're willing to send me one, i'll play round with it though.

Spiecus
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2008 10:54 pm

Sd2

Post by Spiecus »

I thank everyone for their suggestions. I tried opening them as raw files but always ended up with "Donald Duck". I finally gave up and griped at the studio that did the original conversion for me enough that they did the conversion for free.

Sorry, I guess I should have added some background. I have a DVD that contains 5.1 audio and a place holder video. Of that, I am using 4 channels for a museum exhibit. I need to edit the audio to take out a section. Nothing I could find could rip 5.1 audio in to anything I could handle, so I had the original audio studio decode it for me (at $65/hr), and they sent me the 6 individual sd2 files. Anyway, now I have them as AIFs and can actually work on them. Then I have to reassemble them back to 5.1.

Again, thanks for the advice. I don't use Goldwave a whole lot, but it is always there when I need it.
Spiecus

DewDude420
Posts: 1164
Joined: Fri Mar 11, 2005 11:15 pm
Location: Washington DC Metro Area
Contact:

Post by DewDude420 »

I thank everyone for their suggestions. I tried opening them as raw files but always ended up with "Donald Duck".
define donald duck exactly...too fast? distorted?

sorry i was away, i could of said this a few days ago but, i kind of got wrapped up in converting my nas machine to run freebsd becuase i got sick of the thing crashing during multiple gig file transfers.

i learned a while back when messing with raw files that if you say...open an 8 bit file up at 16, you'll somewhat hear what's going on, but it will be MASSIVELY distorted.

did you try multiple bit-depths and sampling rates?

You say you had a DVD? Why didn't you mention that. It is entirely possible to extract the AC3 or DTS stream from a DVD, demux it out of the vobs and using various programs you can find online, decode that into 6 discreet wavs...edit...then you can recompress and remux back with the DVD...that is provided it was a DVD-Video compliant disc. - I did a VERY simlar thing back in 2004 before it was possible to "rip" DVD-Audio discs and converted the 5.1 DTS stream of Hotel California into a 5.1 AudioCD DTS (differnet sampling rate and special compression method). I've also converted AC3 files to various formats. (and if you're wondering, i did wind up later on extracting the high-resolution MLP files directly off the DVD-A disc and decoded them using some rather easy to find tools into thier 192/24 digital glory...that rip is probably still circulating the interwebs.

dude, next time you need that stuff done, seriously, contact me. I can beat $65/hour and i'll make sure your audio is in a format you can use :)

Spiecus
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2008 10:54 pm

donald duck

Post by Spiecus »

it sounded too fast at whatever bit rate I tried. I didn't try other resolutions, as I didn't have a whole lot of time to play with it. I have been tied up with setting up a traveling exhibit at work. Things should settle down next week so I can work on it again. I will keep you in mind the next time something weird comes up. Regarding audio, that is. There is always something weird coming up in one form or another.
Thanks again
spiecus

DewDude420
Posts: 1164
Joined: Fri Mar 11, 2005 11:15 pm
Location: Washington DC Metro Area
Contact:

Post by DewDude420 »

too fast = too high a sampling rate. lowering the playback rate of the file (because, yes, there's sample rate of a file and PLAYBACK rate of a file. sample rate determies how many samples per second there are...playback rate is how many samples a second are played). you could of just kept lowering the playback rate till you found what you needed.

MOA
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Jan 02, 2009 7:35 pm

Donald Duck from SD2

Post by MOA »

Sorry you wasted so much time trying to get rid of Donald Duck. :lol: That results from opening a mono file as stereo. Try opening it as mono and the speed will be normal.
Moa

DewDude420
Posts: 1164
Joined: Fri Mar 11, 2005 11:15 pm
Location: Washington DC Metro Area
Contact:

Post by DewDude420 »

MOA: yes, that's another possibility I had forgotten about.

If you have a RAW file (or something that doesn't have a header) and it contains one channel of audio, telling it it's stereo will in fact double the speed at which the file is played back at.

the only way you can actually tell what kind of file you have is to open it both ways...there's also something else to look for.

if you have say 44.1 kHz PCM in a raw format that's mono, but open it in stereo - when you adjust your playback rate to get the proper speed you'll notice the spectrogram output looks funky, almost like it was filtered to half the spectrum response...but it's a specific look becuase even when you do that to a nomral file...you've got a LOT of activity around like, 1 - 3 khz, your mid ranges...and when you've got a mono/stereo mismatch everything will look like it's shifted lower (it probably even sounds funky, don't remember)

these are things you just kind of have to play around with and look at. save some 44.1khz files as mono RAW .snd files and open them up as stereo and decrease the playback rate in half and you'll see what i mean.

Post Reply