Solfeggio frequencies

GoldWave general discussions and community help
Post Reply
KingDave
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2020 1:59 pm

Solfeggio frequencies

Post by KingDave »

Hi to all users of Goldwave! :D

My question is about Solfeggio frequencies:
I have seen that there is a procedure to convert 440 hz audio to 432 hz very simply using the "PITCH" command in the "EFFECTS" window of goldwave. Just set the 98.182 value to "SCALE (%)" and click OK and you're done!
Now, based on this procedure that I read here in this forum, I wanted to know how to find all the other solfeggio frequencies, that is:

174 Hz: relieves pain and stress
285 Hz: Heals Tissues & Organs
396 Hz: Eliminates Fear
417 Hz: Wipes out Negativity
528 Hz: Repairs DNA, Brings Positive Transformation
639 Hz: Brings Love & Compassion in Life
741 Hz: Detoxifies Cells & Organs
852 Hz: Awakens Intuition, Raises Energy at Cellular Level
963 Hz: Connects to Higher Self.

If it is not possible to convert all the frequencies, to be able to convert at least the 528 hz one, since I would really need that frequency but if you can give me the values of all the frequencies it would be fantastic for me! Thanks in advance for your attention and for your help!

2leftfeet
Posts: 109
Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2013 10:28 pm
Location: Napier New Zealand

Re: Solfeggio frequencies

Post by 2leftfeet »

Open a new file and then go to the "Expression Evaluator" button on the main toolbar and then when you get the drop down menu there, click on "Waves". Go to "Sine" and in the "f" box put in the frequency you wish to generate. click OK and there you have it.

KingDave
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2020 1:59 pm

Re: Solfeggio frequencies

Post by KingDave »

2leftfeet wrote:
Wed Jun 24, 2020 10:15 pm
Open a new file and then go to the "Expression Evaluator" button on the main toolbar and then when you get the drop down menu there, click on "Waves". Go to "Sine" and in the "f" box put in the frequency you wish to generate. click OK and there you have it.
Hi 2leftfeet! First of all thanks much for your reply! I did what you told me and I tried to punt in the f box 528 becuase i wanted to try the 528 Hz but when I did that the only thing that I had it was the sound frequency 528 hz! What I asked was to put a file audio in goldwave and then to change frequency I wish, in other words all my music at 440Hz convert it to 528hz. With your procedure I find the sound of the single frequency that I am going to put in "f" box and not the conversion of the entire song to the desired frequency! I don't know if I managed to explain myself...Sorry for my English but I'm Italian! Anyway thanks again for your reply mate!

DougDbug
Posts: 2067
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2005 3:33 pm
Location: Silicon Valley

Re: Solfeggio frequencies

Post by DougDbug »

in other words all my music at 440Hz convert it to 528hz.
A = 440Hz simply the normal tuning standard. Musical Notes & Frequencies.

It's arbitrary but it means everybody can agree on what an 'A" is (and all of the other notes can be derived from there) and it allows a band/orchestra to play in-tune and it allows musical instrument manufacturers to make instruments that are tuned (or can be tuned) alike so they can play together.

If you are singing A cappella or playing a solo instrument you don't have to play/sing standard notes. An "out-of-tune" solo guitar will sound perfectly fine as long as it's in-tune with itself. Some instruments (like guitar) can be easily tuned to a different standard. It takes a long time to re-tune a piano so if there is a piano, usually the whole band tunes their instruments to match the piano. Some horns & woodwinds can't be re-tuned.

528Hz is not a standard note but there is a 'C' at 523.251Hz. It might be better to re-tune/de-tune the 'C'.

Although virtually all music is tuned to A=440, there are many songs that don't have any 'A' notes, or they may have 'A' notes in higher or lower octaves. So, you can re-pitch a song, changing it from 440Hz to 528Hz and there may not be any sound at exactly 528Hz.

All real world sounds contain harmonics & overtones (additional frequencies) and that's why a trumpet playing an 'A' sounds different from a piano playing the same note.

Regular music with multiple instruments & voices, some playing chords, contains thousands of simultaneous frequencies.

GoldWave can show the frequency content as the music is playing -
If you don't already have the "large" controls/meter showing click Window -> Classic Contol. Then right-click on the meters and select Spectrum.
If it is not possible to convert all the frequencies, to be able to convert at least the 528 hz one, since I would really need that frequency but if you can give me the values of all the frequencies it would be fantastic for me! Thanks in advance for your attention and for your help!
With simple pitch-shifting, everything gets shifted by the same percentage. For example, there is a standard 'F' at 174.614 Hz and that could be shifted down slightly to match your 174Hz target and everything else will be shifted-down by the same percentage. (With such a slight change you won't hear a difference unless you are a musician trying to play in-tune.)

With more advanced software it's possible to shift different frequencies differently but then the music will sound out-of-tune.

KingDave
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2020 1:59 pm

Re: Solfeggio frequencies

Post by KingDave »

DougDbug wrote:
Thu Jun 25, 2020 11:47 am
in other words all my music at 440Hz convert it to 528hz.
A = 440Hz simply the normal tuning standard. Musical Notes & Frequencies.

It's arbitrary but it means everybody can agree on what an 'A" is (and all of the other notes can be derived from there) and it allows a band/orchestra to play in-tune and it allows musical instrument manufacturers to make instruments that are tuned (or can be tuned) alike so they can play together.

If you are singing A cappella or playing a solo instrument you don't have to play/sing standard notes. An "out-of-tune" solo guitar will sound perfectly fine as long as it's in-tune with itself. Some instruments (like guitar) can be easily tuned to a different standard. It takes a long time to re-tune a piano so if there is a piano, usually the whole band tunes their instruments to match the piano. Some horns & woodwinds can't be re-tuned.

528Hz is not a standard note but there is a 'C' at 523.251Hz. It might be better to re-tune/de-tune the 'C'.

Although virtually all music is tuned to A=440, there are many songs that don't have any 'A' notes, or they may have 'A' notes in higher or lower octaves. So, you can re-pitch a song, changing it from 440Hz to 528Hz and there may not be any sound at exactly 528Hz.

All real world sounds contain harmonics & overtones (additional frequencies) and that's why a trumpet playing an 'A' sounds different from a piano playing the same note.

Regular music with multiple instruments & voices, some playing chords, contains thousands of simultaneous frequencies.

GoldWave can show the frequency content as the music is playing -
If you don't already have the "large" controls/meter showing click Window -> Classic Contol. Then right-click on the meters and select Spectrum.
If it is not possible to convert all the frequencies, to be able to convert at least the 528 hz one, since I would really need that frequency but if you can give me the values of all the frequencies it would be fantastic for me! Thanks in advance for your attention and for your help!
With simple pitch-shifting, everything gets shifted by the same percentage. For example, there is a standard 'F' at 174.614 Hz and that could be shifted down slightly to match your 174Hz target and everything else will be shifted-down by the same percentage. (With such a slight change you won't hear a difference unless you are a musician trying to play in-tune.)

With more advanced software it's possible to shift different frequencies differently but then the music will sound out-of-tune.
Thank you very much for your explanation DougDbug and I understand what you meant.
Anyway, as I said initially using the goldwave pitching and the right parameters it is possible to convert the music at 440hz to 432hz Just set the 98.182 value to "SCALE (%)" to make sure it worked, I went to https://www.szynalski.com/tone-generator
and I set the frequency at 432Hz and was perfectly in tune! So if the value in Goldwave for 432hz is 98.182
So, all I want to know is:
if in goldwave the value 98.182 = 432hz
582hz which value does it correspond to?

How to find the other values to be entered on goldwave
using the "PITCH" command in the "EFFECTS" window to find the other solfeggio frequencies?
That means:
174 Hz
285 Hz
396 Hz
417 Hz
528 Hz
639 Hz
741 Hz
852 Hz
963 Hz


I need to know ONLY this, because i don't know how to get the right value to find the desired frequency as other people did during a discussion on this forum. The only thing I understood is that the value 98.182 if I put it in PITCH corresponds to 432hz .I know perfectly well that the discussion is very long and complex in this regard but it is enough for me to simply find the single values for those solfeggio frequencies that can be inserted on the goldwave pitch. I hope I have been clearer this time and have correctly reported my initial request of help. Thanks again for your help.

KingDave
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2020 1:59 pm

Re: Solfeggio frequencies

Post by KingDave »

Oh btw, someone gaves me this table of frequencies===> https://ibb.co/FXsVvNM
Could it be useful in some way to derive those values to be inserted on goldwave that I am desperately looking for?
Thanks again for your help!

DougDbug
Posts: 2067
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2005 3:33 pm
Location: Silicon Valley

Re: Solfeggio frequencies

Post by DougDbug »

They are giving you the difference from A=440 and you can calculate a percentage. You don't really need those alternate A-note tunings unless you are tuning an instrument. In GoldWave you want the percentage difference from the nearest standard note.

For example -

For 174Hz they give you A = 438.48. That's a reduction of 438.48 / 440 = 0.996 = 99.6%.

Or, if you look at the standard-tuning chart you'll find the closest standard note to 174 is F3 at 174.614Hz.
You get the same result with 174 / 174.614 = 0.996 = 99.6%

I put that chart into a spreadsheet and I get

Code: Select all

Freq	 A		Percent change
174	438.48	99.65454545
285	453.37	103.0386364
396	444.34	100.9863636
417	441.78	100.4045455
432	432   	98.18181818
440	440    	100
528	444	100.9090909
639	451   	102.5
741	440.6	100.1363636
852	451.33	102.575
963	428.96	97.49090909
...If I was making a spreadsheet for myself I'd skip A-note conversions and just find the closest standard note frequency. For example 174 converts to 174.614Hz, etc.

KingDave
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2020 1:59 pm

Re: Solfeggio frequencies

Post by KingDave »

DougDbug wrote:
Fri Jun 26, 2020 1:09 pm
They are giving you the difference from A=440 and you can calculate a percentage. You don't really need those alternate A-note tunings unless you are tuning an instrument. In GoldWave you want the percentage difference from the nearest standard note.

For example -

For 174Hz they give you A = 438.48. That's a reduction of 438.48 / 440 = 0.996 = 99.6%.

Or, if you look at the standard-tuning chart you'll find the closest standard note to 174 is F3 at 174.614Hz.
You get the same result with 174 / 174.614 = 0.996 = 99.6%

I put that chart into a spreadsheet and I get

Code: Select all

Freq	 A		Percent change
174	438.48	99.65454545
285	453.37	103.0386364
396	444.34	100.9863636
417	441.78	100.4045455
432	432   	98.18181818
440	440    	100
528	444	100.9090909
639	451   	102.5
741	440.6	100.1363636
852	451.33	102.575
963	428.96	97.49090909
...If I was making a spreadsheet for myself I'd skip A-note conversions and just find the closest standard note frequency. For example 174 converts to 174.614Hz, etc.
Wow you are awesome mate! Thanks very much for the values that you found!!
So If i understood well if I want to convert in goldwave a 440hz song in 528hz for example, I should to put the value 100.9090909 in "SCALE (%)" correct? And thanks to your explanation I even understood how you found the values I was looking for: if for example I want to find the value for goldwave of the 528hz frequency I have to divide 444 with 440 and you're done!
I also found a site where you can convert your audio files from 174hz to 963hz! And I saw that in this site there is also that table that I sent you last time===> https://www.432hzconverter.com maybe it could be useful to help you to find a better value!
Thanks again for your fantastic help mate: you saved my life! lol

lwk
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Sep 25, 2014 4:28 pm

Re: Solfeggio frequencies

Post by lwk »

DougDbug wrote:
Thu Jun 25, 2020 11:47 am

Although virtually all music is tuned to A=440
A=440 is indeed considered to be a global standard for tuning but the real world reveals a different picture. That arbitrary number was established during a musicology convention that took place in Canada in 1939. In practice, orchestras from around the world tend to choose a variety of tuning. Those choices generally fall in a range between A=435 and A=444. Instrument makers often choose to build their instruments specifically to cope more easily with the common tuning practices in various geographical locations around the world. It is actually fairly common for a professional orchestral player of a "fixed tuned" instrument to own an instrument that has been built specifically to play in a European tuning market and a different instrument to perform in a North American market.

During the extensive period of time when listening to recorded music depended on NON-digital equipment the pitch of the played back sound depended on the speed of the moving parts of the machine that was used to recreate the sounds. The rotational speed of a turntable was often adjustable to as to increase or decrease the pitch of the sounds it played back. The same was often true of magnetic tape machines. In the jazz world it was quite common for players to practice playing along with recorded tunes while making use the speed controls to change the pitch of an "A pitch" playback to "A flat" or "A sharp". In that manner the player could "play along with" a tune in three different keys while using a single recording. The idea of variable speed control was also common in the early days of digital machines. I have and continue to use a couple of of Technics CD Player SL-P1200X machines that are equipped with a "Pitch Control Knob" that changes the pitch by approximately +/-8%. Those machines were "state of the art" in 1985. It still is a blast to use that pitch knob to raise and lower the pitch of digital recordings.

It certainly is true that tuning choices are wildly variable and complicated in the real world. The important thing is that the resulting sounds are somehow pleasing to those who hear them.

Larry

DougDbug
Posts: 2067
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2005 3:33 pm
Location: Silicon Valley

Re: Solfeggio frequencies

Post by DougDbug »

I'll add one more thing...

Soundcard clocks (oscillators) are sometimes "off". i.e. the 44.1kHz sample rate isn't exactly 44.1kHz. No clock is perfect but I've heard of clocks being off by as much as 3%. If the clock is off, the pitch and tempo are off proportionally.

Usually nobody notices except musicians trying to play in-tune, Or, when musicians record on one device and play-back on another, or if they are recording with a high-quality USB interface while listening to a backing track on their "cheap" soundcard. When the tracks are mixed the pitches don't match. And since the timing is also off the tempos can drift out-of-sync by the end of the song. Similar problems can happen when two different musicians are working together but using different computers/equipment.

I have an older turntable with a speed control but it also has a strobe so you can get the speed "right". I think the main reason they give you an adjustment was so you could keep it at exactly 33 1/3rd or exactly 45 RPM, but it can also be used if the record was recorded at the wrong speed. With quartz speed control or synchronous motors an adjustment wasn't necessary to keep the speed correct (just like a "good" soundcard/interface). "Modern" DJs use the speed control to pitch-match when they are mixing two songs played in different keys.

KingDave
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2020 1:59 pm

Re: Solfeggio frequencies

Post by KingDave »

lwk wrote:
Fri Jun 26, 2020 11:05 pm
DougDbug wrote:
Thu Jun 25, 2020 11:47 am

Although virtually all music is tuned to A=440
A=440 is indeed considered to be a global standard for tuning but the real world reveals a different picture. That arbitrary number was established during a musicology convention that took place in Canada in 1939. In practice, orchestras from around the world tend to choose a variety of tuning. Those choices generally fall in a range between A=435 and A=444. Instrument makers often choose to build their instruments specifically to cope more easily with the common tuning practices in various geographical locations around the world. It is actually fairly common for a professional orchestral player of a "fixed tuned" instrument to own an instrument that has been built specifically to play in a European tuning market and a different instrument to perform in a North American market.

During the extensive period of time when listening to recorded music depended on NON-digital equipment the pitch of the played back sound depended on the speed of the moving parts of the machine that was used to recreate the sounds. The rotational speed of a turntable was often adjustable to as to increase or decrease the pitch of the sounds it played back. The same was often true of magnetic tape machines. In the jazz world it was quite common for players to practice playing along with recorded tunes while making use the speed controls to change the pitch of an "A pitch" playback to "A flat" or "A sharp". In that manner the player could "play along with" a tune in three different keys while using a single recording. The idea of variable speed control was also common in the early days of digital machines. I have and continue to use a couple of of Technics CD Player SL-P1200X machines that are equipped with a "Pitch Control Knob" that changes the pitch by approximately +/-8%. Those machines were "state of the art" in 1985. It still is a blast to use that pitch knob to raise and lower the pitch of digital recordings.

It certainly is true that tuning choices are wildly variable and complicated in the real world. The important thing is that the resulting sounds are somehow pleasing to those who hear them.

Larry
I'm totally agree with you Larry especially when you say "The important thing is that the resulting sounds are somehow pleasing to those who hear them". Plus I wanted to tell you thanks again for your help and for all the interesting info that you wrote so far: it was a true pleasure for me to read them. it's always nice to deal with intelligent and prepared people especially in the field that I love the most: music.
In this regard, I leave you a link on youtube of my last song that I made in 432hz changing the pitch with goldwave https://youtu.be/bz7UtFA_jGo
and thanks to your help I can also convert to 580Hz, a frequency at which I am very fond of the multiple benefits that it develops, some scientists believe that it is possible to make the poisoned water clean and drinkable again thanks to this miraculous frequency

Davide

Post Reply